Who We Are

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“Being a part of a community that is striving to live spiritual ideals in practical reality is an exciting and fulfilling vocation.”

  --Kimberly Dorn, coworker

Plowshare Farm is a community whose primary task is to serve those in need of special care.  Harmonious to this task come a wide variety of activities which support Plowshare Farm’s striving to be a vessel for the balanced and healthy unfolding of the human being.  How this manifests and the exact nature of our daily tasks are more challenging to describe.

Like a well-functioning farm (one of the things we strive to be) at Plowshare Farm there are many complexities of relationships and inter-weavings.  We are a group of people – coworkers and their families, residents, apprentices, and volunteers who live together in what we call lifesharing homes.  We are a biodynamic farm.  We are a bakery, woodwork and candle-making workshops.  We are a vocational training center for people with special needs who join us during the day time.  We are a ‘safe port’ for those who, within their lives’ journeys, need some time in a haven for repair.  We are fertile ground for other initiatives to meet, germinate and grow.  We are a place where the line between caregiver and care receiver is blurred through the understanding that we each have something to learn from the other and that caring for someone or something else is often a very fine path for self-development.

At the heart of these layers is a conscious reaching toward the unfolding of what is truly human in us.  Questions such as, "What am I, in my deepest Self, striving toward?" and "What is my nobler Self and how might I become it?" are questions which all of us - coworkers, residents, apprentices and volunteers - have an opportunity to explore within the structure of our daily lives.  As a community, we carry the questions, "How can we reach toward a relationship with our natural resources that is sustainable?  How can we participate in bringing about social renewal?  How can we stand as a beacon for conscious, interdependent living?"